Tian Zi Fang: The Hippest Neighborhood of Shanghai

“It is amazing on the 2F” it says on the door.   We walked in and were greeted with nothing but stocks of coffee and a stairway.

We walked up and the steep flight led to an amazing albeit crowded 2F indeed, wrapping us with the wonderful scent of roasted java.

It is an unpretentious charming little café that has a wide choice of coffees and serves Japanese comfort food.

A Japanese guy mans the bar, he is said to be the owner of Café Dan, this hip café restaurant in Shanghai’s hippest district, Tian Zi Fang.

Taikang Road, used to be Shanghai’s “old” art district where one would find a range of Chinese calligraphies and traditional ink paintings. Now also known as Tian Zi Fang is a hip new assortment of design and art enclaves and cozy cafe and bars.  It is a maze of old residential shikumen that got invaded by artists and local designers.

Many of the little shops here carry original designs and a myriad of small art galleries are scattered all over this artsy compound.

A typical boutique.

Tian Zi Fang integrates heritage, the arts and urban amenities.

Many of the houses in this 1920s commune rented out their ground floors to boutiques & restaurants and it is not unlikely to see locals going about their business like doing laundry, cooking etc. as you are to see yuppies sipping lattes.

The place is particularly busy in the weekend when people come to have coffee and indulge in some healthy window-shopping or even some real shopping.

Useful Info:

Cafe Dan
Back street 41-248 Taikang Lu
Tel:  021-64661042
Website:  www.idancoffee.com
Park in:  Riuyue Parking
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3 Responses to Tian Zi Fang: The Hippest Neighborhood of Shanghai

  1. ewok1993 says:

    very interesting place.

    i wonder if it’s safe/easy for someone who doesn’t speak any chinese language to visit by themselves, or being part of a guided tour is better?

    Like

    • Jenn says:

      I find that many can speak English, albeit limited. I get by with my poor mandarin but I would highly recommend getting a guide to do away with sign languages and blank stares. With a good English speaking guide, one can appreciate the history and culture more.

      Like

  2. Caroline L says:

    Intresting post, great pictures!

    Like

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