A Moment with a Lang Dulay

I have learned to appreciate art in various forms – from painting, pottery, sculpture to graphic and interior designs, to even the performing arts – and most recently, the artistry of weaving, more specifically T’nalak weaving.

The T’bolis are known for their traditional fabric called T’nalak.  This is made of long threads of Philippine-grown abaca fibers dipped in red and dark brown dyes.  I am awed that it takes an enormous amount of time (like 6 months) to finish a 5m x 0.60m piece.  And it is woven by “dreamweavers” whose designs are inspired by their dreams.

Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan (GAMABA) is a program aimed at celebrating and safeguarding the work of indigenous and traditional artists of the Philippines.  It provides recognition to National Living Treasures, the highest honor given to indigenous folk artist for their outstanding work in creating, preserving and promoting traditional art forms that are threatened with extinction.  Awardees are artists who have manifested willingness to share their rare skill with others, especially younger members of their community.

Lang Dulay, known as THE Dreamweaver, fit that bill.  A National Living Treasure awardee since 1998, this 85-year-old native from South Cotobato opened a training center in Lake Sebu.

Her workshop is a 4m x 10m elevated rectangular bamboo/nipa hut

Her students.  Unfortunately at the time of visit, the center was closed due to some affair.

and this is where she trains her students,

including this protégé.

Her works are incredible but most of all, her heart is awe-inspiring.  What a great privilege and honor to meet such a humble and gifted person who is National Artist in stature.

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7 Responses to A Moment with a Lang Dulay

  1. A marvelous post and beautiful photos! What a wonderful, talented and inspiring woman! Thank you for sharing this with us! Have a great week!

    Sylvia

    Like

  2. J Bar says:

    Great post.

    Like

  3. ann chin says:

    This weaving looks similar to sarawak’s. Such craft should never to allowed to die out. Paki Paki (clap clap) to the teacher.

    Like

  4. Ebie says:

    How remarkable that she could pass on her talent. Such great artistry in those handcrafted fabrics.

    P.S. I love your new blog layout.

    Like

  5. zeal4adventure says:

    Ann: Because it’s soo close to Mindanao, in fact, I think it is closer than Manila (our capital) is to Mindanao.

    Ebie: Thanks!

    Like

  6. JennJilks says:

    What a beautiful world! Great photos. Well done.

    Like

  7. Indrani says:

    What a wonderful post on this form of art.Very informative, I like your interests and how you share it.

    Like

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